Thursday, 14 March 2019

Lecture triple bill, IAA member Hayden on TV, more lectures, Dark Sky Week, ISS, DIAS events, Earth Hour, Yuri's Night, more...

Hi all,

 

1. IAA Lecture, Wed 20 March. Members' Night, Triple Bill! This meeting features short talks by IAA members, but is open to everyone, as usual

   (1) Brian Beesly (President) will give a talk entitled "Kenneth Edgeworth; soldier, engineer, economist and astronomer". Edgeworth was an Irishman who predicted the existence of the "Kuiper Belt", but which we call the "Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt" a region beyone Pluto full of comets and asteroid-type bodies such as Sedna.

   (2) Paul Evans will then talk on "Apollos 9 & 10, Getting it All Together". Does what it says on the tin!

   (3) I will then give a talk on my recent visit to Cape Canaveral, entitled "The Kennedy Space Centre - Americans in Space". The KSC covers the US manned space programme from Mercury through to the current involvement in the ISS, and looks forward to their future plans for the Moon and Mars, and the current progress from private firms such as Space-X, Blue Origin and Boeing. Amazing exhibits, interactions, tours etc.

Bell Lecture Theatre, Physics Building , QUB, 7.30pm

All welcome. Free admission, including light refreshments.

 

2. NEW. Stop Press!: Hayden Geraghty on UTV Live, 7.30 p.m. this Thursday 14 March.

   Hayden is probably our youngest member, and anyone who follows local news and social media will know what a little star he is! If you don't know him, I won't spoil the story – just watch the programme

 

3. NEW. Newport Astronomy Club, 14 March: Brian MacGabhann (whose talk 'How we

got to the Moon and Back' was one of the highlights of our 2018 festival) will return to Newport THIS THURSDAY 14th March to give a talk entitled 'Einstein made – relatively – Simple'. The talk takes place in Hotel Newport at 8pm.  Newport Astronomy Club members free, non-members also very welcome - €5 at the door.

4. Also: International Dark Sky Week 31 March – 7 April: We have lined up a week full of free events in various venues around Mayo for this annual celebration of dark skies. The programme, includes talks by Gary Fildes of Kielder Observatory Northumberland, and a welcome return by Mayo Dark Skies patron Duncan Stewart.

 

5. The ISS continues its series of morning passes until 15 March Details for your own location, and lots more info on space and astronomy, on www.heavens-above.com.

If you want to check for transits of the ISS across the Sun or the Moon which occur somewhere near you, visit http://transit-finder.com

 

6. New 20th March: DIAS Dunsink Observatory Public Open Night 
Public Open Night, including a history talk, an introductory talk to science research by a member of DIAS, tours of the observatory and telescopes, and observing the moon, stars and planets (weather permitting). 8pm-10pm (gates open 7:30)  Register in advance here.

 

7. New. 21st March: 13.00, DIAS Burlington House, Burlington Rd, Dublin. Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Peter Gallagher will explore: 'What is Extraterrestrial Life? Exoplanets, Earth-like planets, SETI - what next, life?' Part one of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

8. New  27th March: DIAS Dunsink Observatory Public Open Night 
Public Open Night, including a history talk, an introductory talk to science research by a member of DIAS, tours of the observatory and telescopes, and observing the moon, stars and planets (weather permitting). 8pm-10pm (gates open 7:30)  Register in advance here.

 

9. New 28th March: 13.00, DIAS Burlington House, Burlington Rd, Dublin. Erwin Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Chris Bean will explore: 'Earth processes – drivers for life: Insights into how Earth processes determine life on our planet.' Part two of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

10. EARTH HOUR at BCO, 30 March.

This is a global campaign that seeks to raise awareness of environmental issues via a symbolic "Lights Out" event. This Lights Out event also serves as a wonderful opportunity to discuss Ireland's Dark Sky Heritage. As recipients of the International Astronomical Union's Dark Skies For All fund, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory are affirming our commitment to promoting and protecting Ireland's astronomical heritage by using Earth Hour to launch a 6 Week program of Dark Sky Events.   

   We have a jam-packed schedule of free events on the night, including a Star Cycle, Public Astronomy Sessions and more. Full schedule via the link below.

Time: 8 pm – 10 pm, Audience: Public, Admission:  Free

Further details here: https://www.bco.ie/events/earth-hour-3/

 

11. Dark Sky Week Workshops at CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, April 1-5

 For Dark Sky Week, discover how your students can participate in citizen science with Globe at Night. Learn about constellations and get ready to report on how light pollution affects your view of the night sky.  How can light fittings be designed to give us light where we need it and still let us see the stars? Each visit also includes a Planetarium Show and Castle Tour.

Time: 10 am – 1pm. Audience: 3rd Class to 6th Class. Admission: €5 per student. Further details here: https://www.bco.ie/events/dark-sky-week-workshops/

 

12. New. 4th April: Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Barry Lewis will explore: 'What is life? One question, many answers. The language of life in early Ireland and Wales'. Part three of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

13. COSMOS 2019. 5-7 April, Athlone.

Aimed at all levels of interest, ages and demographics, COSMOS brings together astronomers, scientists, rocket engineers as well as amateurs, families and enthusiasts for a celebration of Irish Astronomy. DIAS Scholar, Sam Green will give a talk at the event on "Stellar Winds are Blowing Bubbles". More details later See here for further information. 
 

14. Yuri's Night, Friday April 12;

Event at CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory

 Have you ever wanted to see what the Moon looks like through a telescope? Well this is your chance! Join us at CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory where we'll be celebrating the anniversary of humanity's first orbit of Earth, by checking out our nearest celestial neighbour with FREE telescope viewing sessions.

   Observing, as always, is weather dependent.

Time: 6 pm – 8 pm. Audience: Public/Families, Admission:  Free.

Further details here: https://www.bco.ie/events/lifelong-learning-festival-yuris-night/

 

15. New. 25th April: Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Werner Nahm FRS will explore: 'Beyond the 'What is Life?' lectures and book: The legacy of Professor Erwin Schroedinger...' The final lecture of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

16. Become an IAU Dark Skies Ambassador. The IAU100 Global Project Dark Skies for All project aims to raise awareness for the preservation of quiet and dark skies and claim the right to future generations to continue to access our true night skies. The project now opens the registration for becoming one of its ambassadors. Additionally, the IAU100 is issuing a call for proposals to receive the "Turn on the Night" educational kit and encourages educators, astronomy professionals and enthusiasts around the world to apply.
You can find more information here:
https://www.iau-100.org/darkskies-ambassadors-call 

 

17.  IAU100 Amateur Astronomy Day Event on 13 April 2019 in Brussels
On Saturday 13 April 2019 at the Palace of the Academies in Brussels, Belgium, the International Astronomical Union will organise its first event for amateur astronomers. With an inspirational full-day event that will include NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld, renowned scientists involved in hot topics in astronomy and presentations from the amateur astronomical community. With this event, the IAU aims to further build the relationship between amateur astronomers, their organizations and the IAU. The IAU100 Secretariat hereby invites amateur astronomers to attend the event.
   You can find more information here:
https://www.iau-100.org/amateur-astronomers-day

 

18. New. Suggest names for Jupiter's new moons. Contest End Date: April 15, 2019

In July 2018, Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution for Science announced the discovery of 12 new moons orbiting Jupiter. Eleven are "normal" outer moons, and one is what he called an "oddball." This brought Jupiter's total number of known moons to a whopping 79 — the most of any planet in our solar system. Now you can help Sheppard and his co-discoverers select the names for five of these newly announced moons!

 Submit: Tweet your suggested moon name to @JupiterLunacy and tell us why you picked it using 280 characters or fewer or a short video. Don't forget to include the hashtag #NameJupitersMoons.

The General Rules:

– Jupiter Moons must be named after characters from Roman or Greek mythology who were either descendants or lovers of the god known as Jupiter (Roman) or Zeus (Greeks).
– Submissions must be 16 characters or fewer, preferably one word.
– Submissions must not be offensive in any language or to any culture.
– Submissions must not be too similar to the existing names of any moons or asteroids.
– Names of a purely or principally commercial nature are prohibited.
– Names of individuals, places, or events that are principally known for political, military, or religious activities are not suitable.
– Names commemorating living persons are not allowed.

The Rules for Each Individual Moon: 

S/2003 J5 (Jupiter LVII), S/2003 J15 (Jupiter LVIII), and S/2003 J3 (Jupiter LX) are all retrograde and thus names must be related to Jupiter or Zeus and end in an "e."
S/2017 J4 (Jupiter LXV) and S/2018 J1 (Jupiter LXXI) are prograde and thus names must be related to Jupiter or Zeus and end in an "a."
Learn More: Further details about how the International Astronomical Union names astronomical objects can be found here.
This video details some of the possible Jupiter moon names and can tell you more about how the Jupiter moon-naming process works.

Make Sure Your Proposed Name Is Not Already In Use: Current Asteroid names can be checked at the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center here or here.
– Existing names for Jupiter's other moons can be checked at Sheppard's website here.

 

19. Centenary of IAU in 2019:  IAU100: Uniting our World to Explore the Universe
In 2019, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) celebratesits 100th anniversary. To commemorate this milestone, the IAU will organize a year-long celebration to expand awareness of a century of astronomical discoveries as well as to support and improve the use of astronomy as a tool for education, development, and diplomacy under the central theme "Uniting our World to Explore the Universe". The celebrations will stimulate worldwide interest in astronomy and science and will reach out to the global astronomical community, national science organizations and societies, policy-makers, students and families, and the general public.
NEW
 IAU100 Celebrations around the World  for details for your own country, check the link below.
With Astronomy events of all kinds, including national and cultural events, the IAU100 is engaging with different communities worldwide. Meet the
IAU100 National Committees and learn more about the people who are here to support you during the 2019 celebrations.  For the UK, it's Prof Robert Walsh, originally from Belfast, but now at U of Central Lancs (who gave a great talk to the IAA in Belfast some years ago); and for ROI it's the indefatigable Clair McSweeney from BCO in Cork.  See https://www.sciencespace.ie/celebrating-100-years-of-the-international-astronomical-union-ireland/
Read more:
https://www.iau-100.org/national-committees 

 

20. WAGIA special prize

Women and Girls in Astronomy Special Prize
A new special prize has been announced for event organisers that conduct activities for IAU100 that innovatively celebrate Women and Girls in Astronomy. We strongly encourage the organization of activities throughout 2019, as the perfect opportunity to celebrate girls and women in astronomy.
More information:
https://www.iau-100.org/womenandgirls-in-astronomy 

 

21. Einstein Schools program new resources announced
The Einstein Schools program is taking off with over 160 schools working to become IAU-certified Einstein Schools. All participants in this program can now find more teaching resources that can be used in classrooms. For example, there are now a number of black holes' related activities together with more resources on teaching about solar eclipses in preparation for the special ceremonies on May 29 in Principe and Brazil related to the 100th anniversary of Eddington eclipse expedition of 1919 that confirmed Einstein's Theory of General Relativity.
Finally, the project has also added three classroom-useful graphic short stories called "Tales of the Modern Astronomer". These stories were developed at the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory and highlight research related to black holes that are being done today at observatories around the world. 
Find more information at the Einstein Schools official website:
https://www.einsteinschools.org/ 

 

22. European Week of Astronomy and Space Science
Date: 24 – 28 June 2019; Location: Lyon, France. More information: 
https://eas.unige.ch//EWASS/

 

23. Starmus V — Star-studded Lineup for 2019  
Created by Garik Israelian, a researcher at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), the Starmus Festival is a combination of science, art and music that has featured presentations from astronauts, cosmonauts, Nobel Prize winners and other prominent figures from science, culture, the arts and music. Now celebrating its fifth year, and timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings, Starmus V will take place in Bern, Switzerland, from 24 to 29 June 2019. The IAU is a partner organisation of Starmus and among the confirmed speakers will be IAU Secretary General, Piero Benvenuti, and IAU President-elect, Ewine van Dishoeck.  IAU announcement: https://www.iau.org/news/announcements/detail/ann18007/ 

 

24. Festival of Curiosity, Dublin. July 18 – 21, 2019

 

25. IAU100: Moon Landing 50th Anniversary - Let's All Observe the Moon! 
Date: 20 July 2019  
Location: All around the world
More information: https://www.iau-100.org/moon-landing-anniversary 

The Moon will be waning gibbous, and not rising until about midnight, but at least some spectacular formations will be visible for those prepared to stay up late!

 

26. Apollo 11 50th Anniversary. Armagh Observatory and Planetarium will be holding a suite of events through July and August to celebrate this event. More details soon.

 

27. INTERESTING WEBLINKS (Disclaimer - Use of material herein from various sources does not imply approval or otherwise of the opinions, political or otherwise, of those sources).  NB: If the title in the weblink does not indicate the subject matter, I give a brief simple intro before the link. I may also comment about the link afterwards.

 

ASTROPHYSICS

Fossil galaxy from early universe https://www.livescience.com/64914-anemic-galaxy-discovered.html

How much does the Milky Weigh? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190307131412.htm and  https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/mar/07/scientists-milky-way-weighs-galaxy-hubble-nasa?utm_term=RWRpdG9yaWFsX0xhYk5vdGVzLTE5MDMwOA%3D%3D&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=LabNotes&CMP=labnotes_email

   Supernovae companion stars affect type of explosion https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190307131452.htm

Closest young high mass binary discovered https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190311101158.htm

 

COSMOLOGY

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190305100637.htm

This could open up a whole can of physical worms! What about relativity? Photons must have zero rest mass, otherwise they can't travel at the speed of light, since it would take an infinite amount of energy to accelerate them to c. But if they travel at even slightly less than c, how does that affect our measured acceleration of the expansion of the universe, and the need for dark energy to explain it?

 

EARTH & MOON

LAMP shows water movement on Moon https://mail.aol.com/webmail-std/en-gb/DisplayMessage?ws_popup=true&ws_suite=true

New ISS instrument helps farmers https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190306081709.htm

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6801639/NASA-open-moon-samples-Apollo-missions-nearly-50-YEARS-brought-back.html

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6794989/Liquid-water-HOPPING-surface-moon-surface.html

 

EXOPLANETS

https://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/science/101-videos/00000169-30f6-dc18-a17b-35ffb92f0000?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=Science_20190306::rid=1662473516

   https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6778659/First-potential-exoplanet-spotted-Kepler-10-years-ago-FINALLY-confirmed.html and https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190311101212.htm

   https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techandscience/alien-life-could-be-found-around-stars-that-are-squeezed-together-study-suggests/ar-BBUtQDV?ocid=spartandhp

50 billion rogue wandering exoplanets may be in Milky Way https://earthsky.org/space/50-billion-free-floating-planets-in-milky-way

   https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techandscience/some-exoplanets-tilt-too-much-and-its-pushing-everyone-apart/ar-BBUFqOG?ocid=spartandhp

 

EXOLIFE

K-type stars may be best for harbouring life-friendly planets https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190307161924.htm

Chances for life increase when passing stars push binaries closer together https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190307073454.htm

 

IMAGES

https://www.livescience.com/64955-stellar-star-images.html

 

LIGHT POLLUTION

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/03/qa-new-light-pollution-tracking-tool-physicist-s-bright-idea?utm_campaign=news_daily_2019-03-06&et_rid=415711678&et_cid=2701860

 

SOLAR SYSTEM

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6777393/Watch-fascinating-moment-Japanese-spacecraft-Hayabusa-2-BOUNCES-Ryugu.html

  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6548313/NASAs-Juno-spacecraft-spots-violent-plumes-Jupiters-moon-Io.html

   https://www.msn.com/en-ie/news/techandscience/this-is-why-astronomers-think-there-might-be-an-undiscovered-planet-9/ar-BBUBbLK?ocid=spartandhp

Cassini and Juno data challenges theories of how giant planets form https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190306152409.htm

Dust rings in inner SS, and asteroids co-orbiting with Venus – maybe. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190312123629.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_science+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+Science+News%29

 

SPACE

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6778127/One-giant-leap-womankind-Two-NASA-make-history-month-FEMALE-spacewalk.html

   https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6776391/Moon-shot-Toyota-Japan-space-agency-plan-lunar-mission.html

  Space-X capsule makes successful return to Earth https://www.space.com/spacex-crew-dragon-returns-to-earth.html#?utm_source=ls-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=03092018-ls

   NASA approves Dream Chaser spacecraft https://newatlas.com/nasa-dream-chaser-plane-production/57823/

   Space-X to launch secret NASA spaceplane next week. https://newatlas.com/spacex-x-37b/51168/

Apollo 9 remembered https://newatlas.com/apollo-9-lunar-module/58721/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019-03-08%20044217%20Other%20Weekly%20Basic%202019-03-08%20045333%20Highlights%20from%20the%202019%20Geneva%20Motor%20Show&utm_content=2019-03-08%20044217%20Other%20Weekly%20Basic%202019-03-08%20045333%20Highlights%20from%20the%202019%20Geneva%20Motor%20Show+CID_f0af8b9eabe84ddaa990ff90f5fca445&utm_source=Campaign%20Monitor&utm_term=Read%20more

Major challenges to sending astronauts to look for life on Mars https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190306110637.htm

Space-X mission ends 'perfectly'.  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6785595/SpaceX-completes-perfect-mission-Dragon-lands-Atlantic.html

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6800609/Toyota-unveils-concept-moon-rover-Japanese-space-agency-able-carry-astronauts.html

   https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6797113/NASA-humans-moon-stay-2028-Bridenstine-says.html

 

SUN

Chances of another Carrington scale solar storm hitting Earth are not so high. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190312103717.htm - but

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6796801/Scientists-warn-need-better-prepared-study-uncovers-solar-super-storm-3-000-years-ago.html

 

TELESCOPES, INSTRUMENTS

Quantum radio detects faintest possible signals https://mail.aol.com/webmail-std/en-gb/DisplayMessage?ws_popup=true&ws_suite=true

Ultra high-speed video imaging possible with ordinary cameras https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190307131444.htm That would be useful for recording transits of the ISS across the Sun or Moon, or capturing details of a fireball in flight.

 

28. JOINING the IRISH ASTRONOMICAL ASSOCIATION. This link downloads a Word document to join the IAA. http://documents.irishastro.org.uk/iaamembership.doc
If you are a UK taxpayer, please tick the 'gift-aid' box, as that enables us to reclaim the standard rate of tax on your subscription, at no cost to you. You can also make a donation via Paypal if you wish: just click on the 'Donate' button. See also
www.irishastro.org .

 

The Irish Astronomical Association is registered with The Charity Commission for Northern Ireland NIC 105858

 

DISCLAIMER: Any views expressed herein are mine, and do not necessarily represent those of the IAA.

 

Clear skies,

Terry Moseley




Virus-free. www.avast.com

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

Lecture, LP & Dark Sky Park, Meteorites in Belfast, Space events, Apollo 11 talk, ISS, Dunsink open nights, Schroedinger lectures


Hi all,

 

1. IAA Lecture, Wed 6 March. "N. Ireland's first Dark Sky Park and Observatory"

By Prof Brian Espey, TCD, & Mary McKeown and Charmaine Bell, MUDC.

Prof Espey's talk is entitled: "Protecting the night sky from light pollution"

Summary:

Increasing development has led to the increased use of light across Ireland, in both urban and rural areas. More recently, the imperative to reduce energy and carbon use is now leading to the spread of light emitting diode (LED) technology which may result in more light production, rather than less. I will discuss light pollution, the implications of increasing light levels on the night-time environment at night, what we can do about it, and the potential gains to be had from dark skies tourism. I shall also present some results from a recent citizen science project undertaken in conjunction with the Irish Times. You can contribute to this project by completing the survey at: https://bit.ly/2DuxNJv 

   This talk will feature the latest on the light pollution problem, particularly addressing the local situation, by Prof Brian Espey of TCD, the leading authority in Ireland on the issue. 7

   There will also be presentations on the Davagh Forest Dark Sky Park and Observatory, by Mary McKeown of MUDC who is driving the whole project, including a state of the art observatory incorporated in the Visitors Centre, and by Charmaine Bell of MUDC, who is leading the application to the IDA for official Dark Sky Park recognition. I have been leading the IAA input into this project, and you'll be amazed at what it is going to include!

Bell Lecture Theatre, Physics Building , QUB, 7.30pm

All welcome. Free admission, including light refreshments.

 

2. NEW: METEORITES AND THE BIRTH OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM, by Dr Ian Sanders (Trinity College Dublin): 11 March, 7.30 p.m, Ulster Museum, Stranmillis Road, Belfast.

Belfast Geologists' Society event. Admission free.

Start: 7:30pm (refreshments from 7 pm).

SYNOPSIS: "Meteorites are rocks from space that arrive as spectacular fireballs. A few of them are pieces of once-molten metal, and a few are made of basalt, but most of them are so-called chondritic meteorites – aggregates of frozen droplets of olivine-rich rock called chondrules and grains of iron compacted together to form a kind of cosmic sediment.

   Meteorites turn out to be fragments of baby planets called planetesimals that formed out of a huge disk of gas and dust that surrounded the infant Sun 4567 million years ago. Most planetesimals merged together to make the planets we know today, but a few survive, battered and broken, in the asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. These planetesimal remnants, the asteroids, supply us with meteorites and a wealth of clues about events in the very young solar system while the planets were still under construction.

   The talk will focus on some of these clues, addressing the questions they invite. Why is the solar system thought to have begun with a dusty disk?  How can we know the Sun was born 4567 million years ago? Where did the dust in the disk come from? Why did some planetesimals melt and not others? And how were chondrules formed? The talk will also report on developments in astronomy which, with new high-resolution images of young stars with dusty disks and new planets, corroborate the story from meteorites."

    Dr Sanders will have some meteorites for you to see and examine (but NOT to keep!)

 

3. Innovation Week at BCO, 4-9 March

For Space events in Innovation week see https://enterprise.cit.ie/innovation-week

 

4. March 7. Space Careers Roadshow at Athlone Institute of Technology

 For Engineers Week 2019, Athlone Institute of Technology will host a Space Career Roadshow in conjunction with Science Foundation IrelandESERO Ireland and CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory. These roadshows will provide students with an excellent opportunity to engage with space industry professionals, and third level institutions, so that they can get a taste of the exciting opportunities that a STEM career in Space has to offer.

Audience – Transition Year, 5th and 6th year students. Second level teachers. Admission – Free (By invitation). See: https://www.sciencespace.ie/event/space-careers-roadshow-athlone-i

 

5.  March 11. How we got to the Moon and Back, by Brian MacGabhann:

Cork Astronomy Club hosts a talk on the Apollo 11 Mission to the Moon

A milestone in human history, the 1969 Apollo 11 mission landed the first two people on the Moon. Brian MacGabhann,  a prominent amateur astronomer from Galway, will give an illustrated talk "How We Got To The Moon and Back", tracing the steps that led to this achievement, using technology that would now be regarded as primitive.

Time: 7:50 pm for 8 pm; Date: Monday 11th March; Location: UCC Civil Engineering Building, Lecture Theatre 2. Admission: Free

 

6. The ISS continues its series of morning passes until 15 March Details for your own location, and lots more info on space and astronomy, on www.heavens-above.com.

If you want to check for transits of the ISS across the Sun or the Moon which occur somewhere near you, visit http://transit-finder.com

 

7. New 20th March: DIAS Dunsink Observatory Public Open Night 
Public Open Night, including a history talk, an introductory talk to science research by a member of DIAS, tours of the observatory and telescopes, and observing the moon, stars and planets (weather permitting). 8pm-10pm (gates open 7:30)  Register in advance here.

 

8. New. 21st March: 13.00, DIAS Burlington House, Burlington Rd, Dublin. Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Peter Gallagher will explore: 'What is Extraterrestrial Life? Exoplanets, Earth-like planets, SETI - what next, life?' Part one of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

9. New  27th March: DIAS Dunsink Observatory Public Open Night 
Public Open Night, including a history talk, an introductory talk to science research by a member of DIAS, tours of the observatory and telescopes, and observing the moon, stars and planets (weather permitting). 8pm-10pm (gates open 7:30)  Register in advance here.

 

10. New 28th March: 13.00, DIAS Burlington House, Burlington Rd, Dublin. Erwin Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Chris Bean will explore: 'Earth processes – drivers for life: Insights into how Earth processes determine life on our planet.' Part two of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

11. EARTH HOUR at BCO, 30 March.

This is a global campaign that seeks to raise awareness of environmental issues via a symbolic "Lights Out" event. This Lights Out event also serves as a wonderful opportunity to discuss Ireland's Dark Sky Heritage. As recipients of the International Astronomical Union's Dark Skies For All fund, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory are affirming our commitment to promoting and protecting Ireland's astronomical heritage by using Earth Hour to launch a 6 Week program of Dark Sky Events.   

   We have a jam-packed schedule of free events on the night, including a Star Cycle, Public Astronomy Sessions and more. Full schedule via the link below.

Time: 8 pm – 10 pm, Audience: Public, Admission:  Free

Further details here: https://www.bco.ie/events/earth-hour-3/

 

12. Dark Sky Week Workshops at CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, April 1-5

 For Dark Sky Week, discover how your students can participate in citizen science with Globe at Night. Learn about constellations and get ready to report on how light pollution affects your view of the night sky.  How can light fittings be designed to give us light where we need it and still let us see the stars? Each visit also includes a Planetarium Show and Castle Tour.

Time: 10 am – 1pm. Audience: 3rd Class to 6th Class. Admission: €5 per student. Further details here: https://www.bco.ie/events/dark-sky-week-workshops/

 

13. New. 4th April: Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Barry Lewis will explore: 'What is life? One question, many answers. The language of life in early Ireland and Wales'. Part three of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

14. COSMOS 2019. 5-7 April, Athlone.

Aimed at all levels of interest, ages and demographics, COSMOS brings together astronomers, scientists, rocket engineers as well as amateurs, families and enthusiasts for a celebration of Irish Astronomy. DIAS Scholar, Sam Green will give a talk at the event on "Stellar Winds are Blowing Bubbles". More details later See here for futher information. 
 

15. Yuri's Night, Friday April 12;

Event at CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory

 Have you ever wanted to see what the Moon looks like through a telescope? Well this is your chance! Join us at CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory where we'll be celebrating the anniversary of humanity's first orbit of Earth, by checking out our nearest celestial neighbour with FREE telescope viewing sessions.

   Observing, as always, is weather dependent.

Time: 6 pm – 8 pm. Audience: Public/Families, Admission:  Free.

Further details here: https://www.bco.ie/events/lifelong-learning-festival-yuris-night/

 

16. New. 25th April: Schroedinger 'What is Life?' public lecture series
Professor Werner Nahm FRS will explore: 'Beyond the 'What is Life?' lectures and book: The legacy of Professor Erwin Schroedinger...' The final lecture of the four-part lunch time lecture series exploring the question: 'What is Life?' from a number of different perspectives. Register in advance here

 

17. Become an IAU Dark Skies Ambassador. The IAU100 Global Project Dark Skies for All project aims to raise awareness for the preservation of quiet and dark skies and claim the right to future generations to continue to access our true night skies. The project now opens the registration for becoming one of its ambassadors. Additionally, the IAU100 is issuing a call for proposals to receive the "Turn on the Night" educational kit and encourages educators, astronomy professionals and enthusiasts around the world to apply.
You can find more information here:
https://www.iau-100.org/darkskies-ambassadors-call 

 

18.  IAU100 Amateur Astronomy Day Event on 13 April 2019 in Brussels
On Saturday 13 April 2019 at the Palace of the Academies in Brussels, Belgium, the International Astronomical Union will organise its first event for amateur astronomers. With an inspirational full-day event that will include NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld, renowned scientists involved in hot topics in astronomy and presentations from the amateur astronomical community. With this event, the IAU aims to further build the relationship between amateur astronomers, their organizations and the IAU. The IAU100 Secretariat hereby invites amateur astronomers to attend the event.
   You can find more information here:
https://www.iau-100.org/amateur-astronomers-day

 

19. New. Suggest names for Jupiter's new moons

In July 2018, Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution for Science announced the discovery of 12 new moons orbiting Jupiter. Eleven are "normal" outer moons, and one is what he called an "oddball." This brought Jupiter's total number of known moons to a whopping 79 — the most of any planet in our solar system. Now you can help Sheppard and his co-discoverers select the names for five of these newly announced moons!

Contest Launch Date: February 21, 2019. Contest End Date: April 15, 2019

Submit: Tweet your suggested moon name to @JupiterLunacy and tell us why you picked it using 280 characters or fewer or a short video. Don't forget to include the hashtag #NameJupitersMoons.

The General Rules:

– Jupiter Moons must be named after characters from Roman or Greek mythology who were either descendants or lovers of the god known as Jupiter (Roman) or Zeus (Greeks).
– Submissions must be 16 characters or fewer, preferably one word.
– Submissions must not be offensive in any language or to any culture.
– Submissions must not be too similar to the existing names of any moons or asteroids.
– Names of a purely or principally commercial nature are prohibited.
– Names of individuals, places, or events that are principally known for political, military, or religious activities are not suitable.
– Names commemorating living persons are not allowed.

The Rules for Each Individual Moon: 

S/2003 J5 (Jupiter LVII), S/2003 J15 (Jupiter LVIII), and S/2003 J3 (Jupiter LX) are all retrograde and thus names must be related to Jupiter or Zeus and end in an "e."
S/2017 J4 (Jupiter LXV) and S/2018 J1 (Jupiter LXXI) are prograde and thus names must be related to Jupiter or Zeus and end in an "a."
Learn More: Further details about how the International Astronomical Union names astronomical objects can be found here.
This video details some of the possible Jupiter moon names and can tell you more about how the Jupiter moon-naming process works.

Make Sure Your Proposed Name Is Not Already In Use: Current Asteroid names can be checked at the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center here or here.
– Existing names for Jupiter's other moons can be checked at Sheppard's website here.

 

20. Centenary of IAU in 2019:  IAU100: Uniting our World to Explore the Universe
In 2019, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) celebratesits 100th anniversary. To commemorate this milestone, the IAU will organize a year-long celebration to expand awareness of a century of astronomical discoveries as well as to support and improve the use of astronomy as a tool for education, development, and diplomacy under the central theme "Uniting our World to Explore the Universe". The celebrations will stimulate worldwide interest in astronomy and science and will reach out to the global astronomical community, national science organizations and societies, policy-makers, students and families, and the general public.
NEW
 IAU100 Celebrations around the World  for details for your own country, check the link below.
With Astronomy events of all kinds, including national and cultural events, the IAU100 is engaging with different communities worldwide. Meet the
IAU100 National Committees and learn more about the people who are here to support you during the 2019 celebrations.  For the UK, it's Prof Robert Walsh, originally from Belfast, but now at U of Central Lancs (who gave a great talk to the IAA in Belfast some years ago); and for ROI it's the indefatigable Clair McSweeney from BCO in Cork.  See https://www.sciencespace.ie/celebrating-100-years-of-the-international-astronomical-union-ireland/
Read more:
https://www.iau-100.org/national-committees 

 

21. Turn on the Night Educational Kit
The IAU100 Global Project Dark Skies for All project aims to raise awareness of the need to preserve quiet, dark skies and claim the right for future generations to continue to access our true night skies. The IAU100 is issuing a call for proposals to receive the "Turn on the Night" educational kit and encourages educators, astronomy professionals, and enthusiasts around the world to apply.
Throughout the IAU100 Global Program, about 200 educators around the world will be able to have this kit at production cost. Around 50 additional kits will be attributed and distributed for free by the IAU100 Secretariat to those who cannot afford the production cost. To apply for these IAU100 special conditions, please submit the completed application by 1 March 2019.
   More information here:
https://www.iau-100.org/darkskies-for-all 

 

22. WAGIA special prize

Women and Girls in Astronomy Special Prize
A new special prize has been announced for event organisers that conduct activities for IAU100 that innovatively celebrate Women and Girls in Astronomy. We strongly encourage the organization of activities throughout 2019, as the perfect opportunity to celebrate girls and women in astronomy.
More information:
https://www.iau-100.org/womenandgirls-in-astronomy 

 

23. Einstein Schools program new resources announced
The Einstein Schools program is taking off with over 160 schools working to become IAU-certified Einstein Schools. All participants in this program can now find more teaching resources that can be used in classrooms. For example, there are now a number of black holes' related activities together with more resources on teaching about solar eclipses in preparation for the special ceremonies on May 29 in Principe and Brazil related to the 100th anniversary of Eddington eclipse expedition of 1919 that confirmed Einstein's Theory of General Relativity.
Finally, the project has also added three classroom-useful graphic short stories called "Tales of the Modern Astronomer". These stories were developed at the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory and highlight research related to black holes that are being done today at observatories around the world. 
Find more information at the Einstein Schools official website:
https://www.einsteinschools.org/ 

 

24. IAU100 Amateur Astronomy Day Event on 13 April 2019 in Brussels
On Saturday 13 April 2019 at the Palace of the Academies in Brussels, Belgium, the International Astronomical Union will organise its first event for amateur astronomers. With an inspirational full-day event that will include NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld, renowned scientists involved in hot topics in astronomy and presentations from the amateur astronomical community. With this event, the IAU aims to further build the relationship between amateur astronomers, their organizations and the IAU. The IAU100 Secretariat hereby invites amateur astronomers to engage with the event by attending and/or sharing their work as an amateur astronomer.
You can find more information here:
https://www.iau-100.org/amateur-astronomers-day 

 

25. European Week of Astronomy and Space Science
Date: 24 – 28 June 2019; Location: Lyon, France. More information: 
https://eas.unige.ch//EWASS/

 

26. Starmus V — Star-studded Lineup for 2019  
Created by Garik Israelian, a researcher at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), the Starmus Festival is a combination of science, art and music that has featured presentations from astronauts, cosmonauts, Nobel Prize winners and other prominent figures from science, culture, the arts and music. Now celebrating its fifth year, and timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings, Starmus V will take place in Bern, Switzerland, from 24 to 29 June 2019. The IAU is a partner organisation of Starmus and among the confirmed speakers will be IAU Secretary General, Piero Benvenuti, and IAU President-elect, Ewine van Dishoeck.  IAU announcement: https://www.iau.org/news/announcements/detail/ann18007/ 

 

27.  IAU100: Moon Landing 50th Anniversary - Let's All Observe the Moon! 
Date: 20 July 2019  
Location: All around the world
More information: https://www.iau-100.org/moon-landing-anniversary 

The Moon will be waning gibbous, and not rising until about midnight, but at least some spectacular formations will be visible for those prepared to stay up late!

 

28. Festival of Curiosity, Dublin. July 18 – 21, 2019

 

29. INTERESTING WEBLINKS (Disclaimer - Use of material herein from various sources does not imply approval or otherwise of the opinions, political or otherwise, of those sources).  NB: If the title in the weblink does not indicate the subject matter, I give a brief simple intro before the link. I may also comment about the link afterwards.

 

ASTROPHYSICS

https://newatlas.com/intermediate-mass-black-hole-galaxy-center/58710/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019-03-04%20093624%20Other%20Daily%20Basic%202019-03-04%20093918%20New%20evidence%20bolsters%20link%20between%20sleep%20apnea%20and%20Alzheimers%20disease&utm_content=2019-03-04%20093624%20Other%20Daily%20Basic%202019-03-04%20093918%20New%20evidence%20bolsters%20link%20between%20sleep%20apnea%20and%20Alzheimers%20disease+CID_0627b83bd5e8e1b93c10bd5d1288e8a8&utm_source=Campaign%20Monitor&utm_term=Read%20more

Gigantic space bubbles may be firing cosmic rays at Earth. https://www.livescience.com/64900-space-bubbles-jiggle-through-cosmos.html?utm_source=ls-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190304-ls

 

COSMOLOGY

How neutrinos shaped the early universe.  https://www.livescience.com/64905-neutrinos-reveal-cosmic-web.html?utm_source=ls-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190304-ls

 

EARTH & MOON

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6769905/Destroying-life-ending-asteroids-headed-Earth-tougher-thought.html. This is an unrealistic scenario. There are no 25km asteroids heading for Earth in the next 1000y, probably not in the next 10,000y.. Even if there were, we couldn't divert a 1km asteroid to hit the big one head on, if at all. A more realistic exercise would be to see how we could divert or destroy a 1km asteroid that was heading for us, which is a possibility.

NASA discovers second impact crater under Greenland ice. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190211182836.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_science+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+Science+News%29

 

EXOPLANETS

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2019/03/extraterrestrial-life-probably-exists-how-do-we-search-for-aliens/?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=sunstills_20190303::rid=1662473516

The mystery of tilted exoplanets https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190304121557.htm

 

LIGHT POLLUTION

Skyglow over key wildlife areas https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190211083221.htm

 

SOLAR SYSTEM

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6760865/Probes-boost-case-underground-lakes-Mars.html

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techandscience/nasa-eyeballs-bizarre-mars-brain-terrain/ar-BBUnkpz?ocid=spartandhp

Asteroids are tougher than we thought. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190304095926.htm

https://www.livescience.com/64874-farfarout-most-distant-solar-system-body.html?utm_source=ls-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190303-ls They can't be certain about its distance until they have an accurate orbit!

Recent underground volcanism on Mars? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190212134754.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_science+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+Science+News%29

Insulating crust kept cryomagma liquid for millions of years on Ceres. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190212144142.htm

 

SPACE

Developing a flight strategy to land heavier vehicles on Mars. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190211164025.htm

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6772515/China-built-Martian-base-desert.html

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6766067/Space-Xs-new-crew-capsule-Ripley-dummy-aboard-docks-International-Space-Station.html

 

TELESCOPES, INSTRUMENTS

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2019/03/extraterrestrial-life-probably-exists-how-do-we-search-for-aliens/?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=sunstills_20190303::rid=1662473516

 

30. JOINING the IRISH ASTRONOMICAL ASSOCIATION. This link downloads a Word document to join the IAA. http://documents.irishastro.org.uk/iaamembership.doc
If you are a UK taxpayer, please tick the 'gift-aid' box, as that enables us to reclaim the standard rate of tax on your subscription, at no cost to you. You can also make a donation via Paypal if you wish: just click on the 'Donate' button. See also
www.irishastro.org .

 

The Irish Astronomical Association is registered with The Charity Commission for Northern Ireland NIC 105858

 

DISCLAIMER: Any views expressed herein are mine, and do not necessarily represent those of the IAA.

 

Clear skies,

Terry Moseley