Wednesday, 11 January 2023

NY Party book NOW, Lecture, NE Comet? Hottest star discovered at Armagh, Photocomp, Women in Dark Skies, planets, Star parties, IAW Update, Teasers

Hi all,

1. IAA New Year Party, Jan 14 – You must book now! Venue: McBride's, The Square, Comber, Co. Down, Sat 14 January, at 6 p.m. Cost, £10 per person.

Good news: after the break caused by Covid, we're now resuming this annual event. Unfortunately the local Tudor Cinema is now closed, but we will have the use of the room in McBride's for the whole evening, and we'll be showing a space- or astronomy-themed DVD film or documentary – We will bring along a selection, and the one(s) chosen will be decided by popular vote.

  There will be an enhanced selection of finger food, buffet style, plus tea or coffee, and you can buy your own drinks as you wish in the adjoining bar. After that, the film, and then a quiz, with lots of prizes to choose from. The best value in the galaxy!

   N.B. – Bring your own pens to write down the quiz answer; we'll supply the paper.

LOCATION: 1-3 The Square, Comber: BT23 5DX. Or: H723+4P . Parking is available on and around The Square.

  Payment MUST be made in advance, either by Bank transfer, or Paypal, or cheque to the Treasurer, or

* Paypal: See https://irishastro.org/join-the-iaa/  Instead of 'joining' just click on the 'Donate' button and say it's for the NY Party

* Bank transfer: treasurer@irishastro.org

* Cheque: Send to : Mr Pat O'Neill, IAA, , 55 Cranmore Pk, Belfast BT9 6JG.

### Payment MUST be received no later than 13 January!

NB Please bring along as many empty 2-litre carbonated (i.e.fizzy) plastic drinks bottles as possible, for our rocket launching at the NISF event at LNDC on 25 February! Source them from family, friends & neighbours =- we need as many as possible!

 

 

2. IAA Lecture, Wed 18 January, 7.30 p.m, LARMOR LECTURE THEATRE, Physics Building, QUB, by Dr Ernst de Mooj, Astrophjysics Research Centre, QUB

"Searching for molecules in the atmospheres of exoplanets"

Abstract:

Since the discovery of the first exoplanet almost 3 decades ago, thousands of additional exoplanets have been discovered. Most of these planets orbit in systems that do not resemble our own Solar System. What is more, advances in instrumentation and observing techniques have enabled us to start to study the atmospheres of these planets, even directly measuring the signatures of different atoms and molecules in their atmospheres.

   In this talk I will explain how we can study exoplanet atmospheres to determine their compositions, and what this has revealed to date.

   NB: The lectures are now held in the LARMOR Lecture Theatre, also in the Physics Building, which is much bigger, and will allow greater distancing between attendees. Directions. The Larmor is at the other end of the Physics building to the entrance to the Bell LT, which we used previously. It's on the side of the Physics building which is closest to, and parallel to, University Road. There is a ramp to allow wheelchair axis. Please try to be there early, to facilitate a prompt start – access should be available from shortly after 7 p.m.

   ADMISSION FREE – All welcome!

 

3. Possible naked-eye comet

Naked-eye comet visits Earth for 1st time since Neanderthals in 2023 | Space and

See a comet at its closest to the sun on Thursday (Jan. 12) | Space and

Amazing photos of gorgeously green Comet C/2022 E3 (ZFT) |gallery | Space A comet which just might become visible to the unaided eye, if you live somewhere without any light pollution, is hardly going to be an 'amazing show for skywatchers'! It won't look anything like what these long exposure photographs show, even in a telescope. If you overhype these events or phenomena, you just end up with very disappointed viewers, and it may put them off stargazing altogether. Let's hope for the best, but prepare to be disappointed by the visual view.

 

4. Major discovery by Dr Simon Jeffery at AOP

Hot white dwarfs and pre-white dwarfs discovered with SALT | Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society | Oxford Academic (oup.com) This warrants a special mention! One of the stars discovered has a surface temperature of 180,000 deg C, compared to 'just' 5,500 deg C for the Sun.

 

5. Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition opens

Astronomy photographer of the year competition opens for submissions | Space

 

 

6. Women in Dark Skies 2023, Mayo Dark Skies
Our online series of talks, Women in Dark Skies, restarts on Monday 6th February (St Brigid's Day!) at 7pm.  We welcome Dr. Sibylle Schroer to talk about light pollution and aquatic ecology. 

 

7. Venus is now appearing low down in the SSW evening twilight. Watch it gradually move out towards much fainter Saturn, which lies above and to its left. On 10 January the separation will be about 14 degrees. By the 20th they will be only 2.5 degrees apart, and on the 22nd Venus will pass only 232 arcminutes below Saturn; about 4/5 of a lunar diameter. On the 23rd, a slim crescent Moon will lie to the left of the pair.

 

8. ISS. The International Space Station will start a new series of evening passes over Ireland on 18 January . Details on www.heavens-above.com

 

9.  Galway Astrofest Saturday 28 January,

New Venue: the Menlo Park Hotel, Headford Road, Galway,

Lecture Program; Trade Displays and Exhibition; Lunchtime Workshop; Festival Evening Dinner

More details soon

 

10.  N. I Science Festival, 2023, Feb 16 – 26,

The IAA will be doing a major event, at Lough Neagh Discovery Centre, N of Lurgan, on Saturday 25 February. There will be a water/compressed air rocket launching demo and competition in the afternoon, solar and night-time observing if the skies are clear, starshows in our mobile planetarium, a wide selection of meteorites on display, some of which you can actually handle, telescopes on display with advice on buying and using them, a workshop on simple astrophotography, meet the guy who will probably be N.I's first astronaut, bat and moth discovery walks, and more!

   Bring your own 2-litre fizzy drinks plastic bottle to make into an amazing rocket, and we'll have some of our own if you can't. NB – they must be for carbonated, ie fizzy drinks, not still, to withstand the pressure of the compressed air!

More details later. Keep the date free!

 

11. Mars still near its best.

Our ruddy neighbour is still well placed for observing, bright at mag -1.0. and with an apparent diameter of about 13", and now gets higher up earlier in the evenings. Any moderate-sized telescope will show the South polar cap, and a larger one will show other features on the disc. It forms a nice trikangle with Aldebaran and the Pleiades.

 

12. JUPITER

The giant planet is still by far the brightest object in the night sky apart from the Moon.  It still shines at around mag -2.3. The 4 Galilean moons will be easy to see, even in binoculars.

 

13. Irish Astronomy Week, 20 - 26 March – UPDATE (from Ronan Newman)

The goal behind Irish Astronomy Week and its theme "The Stars for Everyone" is to inspire, encourage and help provide opportunities for people of all ages to connect with the Universe, to promote an appreciation and understanding of the night sky, and to enjoy it in a non-intrusive and non-destructive manner.

   There has been an excellent response to this project, far exceeding expectations and I hope participants will make their events free of charge as happens with Science Week, Space Week and Heritage Week, but of course donations can be welcomed for their organisations.

   There is a wide variety of interested groups including the National Parks, Geoparks of the Cooper Coast, Joyce Country and Cuilcagh Lakelands, eco-tourism destinations, all three Planetariums, Observatories, Science Centres, Telescope shops, official IDA Dark Sky locations, Dark Sky Groups, and even remote communities like Clare Island and Inishbofin. As you can imagine several are looking for support and ideas, or just a need for people to give children's workshops, night sky tours or even ways to explore their own dark sky tourism potential.  I am asking fellow outreach co-ordinators of the Irish Astronomical community to please reach out and help in this endeavour.

  The go-fund me page has raised over a phenomenal €1700, the majority of this is going towards a new website which will be online next month. The remaining money will be spent on bookmarks and posters that are being designed for the 150+ libraries that will be sharing our passion with astronomy themed displays of books, e-books, and e-comics. Any remaining donations will be transferred to an IFAS account for the 2024 event. Other libraries will be hosting astronomy talks, if your local library wants to get involved or if you would like to give a talk there, please let me know so I can add to the website.

   None of this could happen without support from all the Irish Astronomy Clubs and Societies, Science Foundation Ireland, fellow amateur astronomers around around the country and the IFAS (Irish Federation of Astronomical Societies) Council who are fully behind and involved in running this project.

  Website coming next month.

  The dates: March 20th to 26th begins with a New Moon and as the days continue there will be three Lunar conjunctions of Jupiter, Venus and M45, its also a perfect time for an "Irish" Messier marathon, the possibilities are endless. Finally, I am delighted to see the return of the COSMOS Starparty in Tullamore and the Skellig Dark Sky Festival both taking place that weekend and I wish them success in their respective events. Happy New Year🙂

 

14. COSMOS 2023: This has now been confirmed for Saturday 25 March. It will be great to have this annual midlands attraction back again. The new venue is a dark sky location: Midlands National Shooting Centre at Boora, County Offaly on Saturday 25th March, and there will be six speakers.

  The shooting centre is less than 15 minutes from Tullamore and has a rustic feel to it, a bit like Annaharvey back in the day

  More details when available.

 

15. New Easy Teaser:

What's next in this sequence? Acrux, Rigil Kentaurus, Hadar (Beta Cen), Achernar, Canopus, Fomalhaut  - ?

Clue: Overhead, you'd be getting warmer.

Another clue: You're leaving Penguins behind.

                                       

16. NEW DIFFICULT TEASER:

What links the following: 2, 34, 58, 99 and 112? A few wrong answers on this, so here's another clue. You can also add 80 to the list; thus 2, 34, 58, 80, 99, 112.

Still no right answers, so another clue: You can also add 93 to the list, thus 2, 34, 58, 80, 93, 99, 112.

 

17: Non-Astronomical Teasers:

Here's two for the holiday period for the non-astronomer spouse / partner / child / parent / significant other etc: Or indeed, yourselves

Difficult: Donegal and Wexford and one other Irish county share a distinction. What is it, and what's the other county?

Again, a few wrong answers, so here's a clue: It's nominal.

Another clue: it's non-repetitive

 

Easy: What town in Mayo is unique in Ireland (apart from the fact that every town is unique)?

Again only a wrong answer, so here's a clue. One Direction.

Another clue: you're looking for part of the name.

 

  Please send all Teaser answers to me at my aol address terrymosel@aol.com

 

18. INTERESTING WEBLINKS (Disclaimer - Use of material herein from various sources does not imply approval or otherwise of the opinions, political or otherwise, of those sources).  NB: If the title in the weblink does not indicate the subject matter, I give a brief simple intro before the link. I may also comment about the link afterwards.

 

ASTROPHYSICS:

Webb reveals wide diversity of galaxies in the early universe (spacedaily.com)

How Star Collisions Forge the Universe's Heaviest Elements - Scientific American

James Webb Space Telescope spies massive shockwave and baby dwarf galaxy | Space

https://www.facebook.com/352364611609411/posts/2381225265389992/?sfnsn=scwspmo

Hubble Space Telescope spots ghostly light from ancient wayward stars | Space

 

COSMOLOGY

The Universe is Brighter Than we Thought - Universe Today (maybe it's all that Dark Matter…. 😉 )

 

EARTH & MOON

NASA Makes Asteroid Defense a Priority, Moving its NEO Surveyor Mission Into the Development Phase - Universe Today

 

IMAGES

Gallery: Incredible images from James Webb's first year in space (newatlas.com)
 
SOLAR SYSTEM

Massive, months-long volcanic eruption roils Jupiter's moon Io | Space

China's 1st Mars rover and Tianwen 1 orbiter may have gone silent: report | Space

 

SPACE

First UK rocket launch ends in failure after suffering 'anomaly' (msn.com) Didn't go all the way, so still technically a virgin…

UK to enter space race with Europe-first satellite launch from Cornwall (aol.co.uk) and

"Start Me Up" Amber-1 & Others | LauncherOne (everydayastronaut.com) and

Fishermen furious as satellite carrying rocket set to launch off Ireland's south west coast tonight (msn.com) . In theory, the plane could take off from any runway capable of handling a Boeing 747. And since the launch from the plane was to the South, why did it have to be close to Irish territorial waters, affecting the fishing boats? It would be just as easy to launch it from 50 or 100km further South.

And https://youtu.be/5Co18HcyqHk

SpaceX's next Falcon Heavy rocket is gearing up for launch | photos | Space

1st Starship orbital launch possible next month, Elon Musk says | Space

China's first private sector 2023 rocket launch up, up and away (spacedaily.com)

NASA Makes Asteroid Defense a Priority, Moving its NEO Surveyor Mission Into the Development Phase - Universe Today

Lightweight Picogram-Scale Probes Could be the Best way to Explore Other Star Systems - Universe Today So a million or so bacterium-sized 'probes' arrive at an exoplanetary system, travelling at near-light speed (say 200,000 km per sec). Then what? The great majority will zoom through the system with no interaction with anything.

  If the system is anything like ours, some (maybe 1% - 2%?) will collide with the particles of dust that pervade the plane of the system, and give us the Zodiacal Light: end of probes. Some (1-2%?) will collide with and be destroyed by the star's solar wind: end of probes. A few (0.01%?) will enter the atmospheres of the planets and be similarly destroyed.

  Would any be captured by the gravity of either the star, or one of its planets? Traveling at that speed, they would have to pass so close to the body that they would certainly be destroyed by either the solar wind or the planet's atmosphere. End result of mission? - Zero.

   Like solar sails, getting to another planetary system at relativistic speeds could be done, but getting any useful information back is damn near impossible.

ALSO – surely the two bright stars are Alpha Centauri and Beta Centauri!?! Not, as stated, Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B, which are the two components of the double star Alpha, and are separated only by about 10 to 20 arcseconds, depending on when the image was taken!

 

SUN

Huge solar flare erupts on the sun from 'hyperactive' sunspot | Space

 

Telescopes, Instruments etc.

NASA unveils initial plan for multibillion-dollar telescope to find life on alien worlds | Science | AAAS

 

19. JOINING the IRISH ASTRONOMICAL ASSOCIATION. This link gives options to join the IAA.

https://irishastro.org/join-the-iaa/ If you are a UK taxpayer, please select the 'gift-aid' box, as that enables us to reclaim the standard rate of tax on your subscription, at no cost to you. You can also make a donation via Paypal if you wish: just click on the 'Donate' button. See also https://irishastro.org/  

 

The Irish Astronomical Association is registered with The Charity Commission for Northern Ireland NIC 105858

 

DISCLAIMER: Any views expressed herein are mine, and do not necessarily represent those of the IAA.

Clear skies,

Terry Moseley


Thursday, 29 December 2022

Major lecture, Mercury, Venus, ISS, Latest sunrise, Comets, Quadrantids, Perihelion, NY Party, Galway astrofest, planets, NISF, IAW, Cosmos, Teasers

Hi all,

1. IAA Lecture, Wed 4 January, 7.30 p.m, LARMOR LECTURE THEATRE, Physics Building, QUB, by Professor Stephen Smartt, PhD, FRS, CBE, MRIA, Christchurch College, U of Oxford

"The final fate of massive stars"

Abstract: We know that supernovae are produced at the end of the nuclear burning lives of some massive stars when the core collapses. But do all massive stars produce a supernova ? They must end their lives somehow as their cores can't resist the pull of gravity for ever. Whether or not they produce a

luminous explosion or collapse to form black holes with little mass ejected and faint emission is still debated. I will review the latest work on trying to work out how massive stars end their lives. 

Biography.

Stephen was until recently Professor of Astrophysics at QUB, and is now the Wetton Professor of Astrophysics at Oxford and the Director of the Hintze Centre for Astrophysical Surveys.

   Stephen is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and was awarded the George Darwin lectureship from the Royal Astronomical Society in 2018. He is a recipient of the Royal Irish Academy's Gold Medal in the physical and mathematical sciences and the Royal Astronomical Society's Herschel Medal. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2020 and awarded a CBE in Queen Elizabeth II's birthday honours list in 2022.

Research Interests:  I work on processing data from several large sky survey projects. One of them, the ATLAS project, is a network of 4 telescopes funded by NASA, which can scan the whole visible sky every 24hrs. We process the data in real time, linking discoveries to galaxy and star catalogues and trigger ESO and other facilities for multi-wavelength follow-up. I work on preparation for the Rubin Observatory's Legacy Survey of Space and Time and have a scientific leadership role in the UK's Lasair project. With colleagues at Queen's and the U of Hawaii I search for the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave sources, mostly from merging neutron stars. We use the Pan-STARRS twin telescope system and then the ESO telescopes for follow-up. I was one of the founding members of ENGRAVE which is a European wide effort to optimise the use of the VLT and ESO facilities for follow-up of the optical and near-infrared emission from gravitational wave sources. I sit on the Rubin Science Advisory Committee, the Virgo Science and Technology Advisory Committee and the Royal Society's Schools Partnerships grant panel.

I can assure you that this will be a fascinating talk!)

   NB: The lectures are now held in the LARMOR Lecture Theatre, also in the Physics Building, which is much bigger, and will allow greater distancing between attendees. Directions. The Larmor is at the other end of the Physics building to the entrance to the Bell LT, which we used previously. It's on the side of the Physics building which is closest to, and parallel to, University Road. There is a ramp to allow wheelchair axis. Please try to be there early, to facilitate a prompt start – access should be available from shortly after 7 p.m.

   ADMISSION FREE – All welcome!

 

2. Mercury is visible as an evening star low down in the SSW, initially just a bit further out from the Sun than Venus, although that situation reverses on 29 December when they pass each other. Start looking low in the SW about 30 minutes after local sunset, with binoculars at first. But never do this before sunset!

 

3. Venus is now appearing very low down in the SSW evening twilight. Also see under 'Mercury' above.

 

4. ISS. The International Space Station continues its series of morning passes over Ireland until 4 January . Details on www.heavens-above.com

 

 

5. Latest Sunrise

The latest sunrise of the winter for our latitudes occurs after the solstice; in Belfast it will be on Dec 29 at 08h 46m 49s.

Obviously, the further West you are, the later it will be, by 4 minutes per degree of longitude. The offset from the solstice occurs because of the difference between clock time, in which each day is exactly 24h, and actual solar time, which varies for a number of reasons, primarily the ellipticity of the Earth's orbit.

 

6. Two comets coming.

This link gives a guide how to find them. One MAY become a naked-eye object early next year. Sneak Peek at Two Promising Comets - Sky & Telescope - Sky & Telescope (skyandtelescope.org)

 

7. QUADRANTIDS This meteor shower peaks on the night of January 3-4. The radiant lies between the end of the handle of the Plough / Big Dipper, and the head of Draco. It's a rich shower: during the fairly short peak the ZHR can reach 100 for a few hours, but the view will be spoiled this year by the almost Full Moon. Still if you can keep the Moon hidden behind a building or evergreen tree, you should still see some good meteors, especially later in the night when the radiant is higher.

   The Zenithal Hourly Rate (ZHR) is the rate which would be seen by an experienced observer, in a VERY dark sky, and with the radiant in the zenith: actual observed rates very rarely reach the nominal ZHR for various reasons.

 

8. Perihelion: The Earth will be closest to the Sun in its annual orbit on January 4 at 16.17, at a distance of 0.9832956 AU, or 147,098,927km.

 

9. IAA New Year Party, Jan 14

Venue: McBride's, The Square, Comber, Co. Down, Sat 14 January, at 6 p.m. Cost, £10 per person. Good news: after the break caused by Covid, we're now resuming this annual event. Unfortunately the local Tudor Cinema is now closed, but we will have the use of the room in McBride's for the whole evening, and we'll be showing a space- or astronomy-themed DVD film or documentary – details TBA. There will be an enhanced selection of finger food, buffet style, plus tea or coffee, and you can buy your own drinks as you wish in the adjoining bar. After that, the film, and then a quiz, with lots of prizes to choose from. The best value in the galaxy!

   N.B. – Bring your own pens to write down the quiz answer; we'll supply the paper.

LOCATION: 1-3 The Square, Comber: BT23 5DX. Or: H723+4P . Parking is available on and around The Square.

  Payment MUST be made in advance, either by Bank transfer, or Paypal, or cheque to the Treasurer, or * cash paid to the Treasurer on the night of the January 4 lecture meeting.

* Paypal: See https://irishastro.org/join-the-iaa/  Instead of 'joining' just click on the 'Donate' button and say it's for the NY Party

* Bank transfer: treasurer@irishastro.org

* Cheque: Send to : Mr Pat O'Neill, IAA, , 55 Cranmore Pk, Belfast BT9 6JG.

### Payment MUST be received no later than 11 January!

 

10. Galway Astrofest returns: Saturday 28 January,

New Venue: the Menlo Park Hotel, Headford Road, Galway,

Lecture Program; Trade Displays and Exhibition; Lunchtime Workshop; Festival Evening Dinner

More details soon

 

11. Mars still near its best.

Our ruddy neighbour is still almost at its best for the year, bright at mag -1.4. and with an apparent diameter of about 15", and now gets higher up earlier in the evenings. And moderate-sized telescope will show the South polar cap, and a larger one will show other features on the disc.

 

12. JUPITER

The giant planet is still by far the brightest object in the night sky apart from the Moon.  It still shines at around mag -2.4. The 4 Galilean moons will be easy to see, even in binoculars.

 

13.  N. I Science Festival, 2023, Feb 16 – 26,

The IAA will be doing at least one major event, at Lough Neagh Discovery Centre, N of Lurgan, on Saturday 25 February. More details later. Keep the date free!

 

14. Irish Astronomy Week, 20 - 26 March - UPDATE

This has been proposed by Ronan Newman from Co Mayo, and member of Galway Astronomy Club, and has been well received. The date agreed is for the week commencing Monday 20 March, ending on Sunday 26 March

  UPDATE: Ronan has set up a Go Fund me page with a description. So please take moment to check out it out. Websites are expensive!

https://gofund.me/74a8c1af

I've started him off with a €50 donation – I hope many others can do likewise, with whatever you think appropriate.

 

15. COSMOS 2023: This has now been confirmed for the weekend commencing 24 March. It will be great to have this annual midlands attraction back again. Venue to be announced, but put it in your diaries.

 

16. New Easy Teaser:

What's next in this sequence? Acrux, Rigil Kentaurus, Hadar (Beta Cen), Achernar, Canopus, Fomalhaut  - ?

                                       

17. NEW DIFFICULT TEASER:

What links the following: 2, 34, 58, 99 and 112?

 

18: Non-Astronomical Teasers:

Here's two for the holiday period for the non-astronomer spouse / partner / child / parent / significant other etc: Or indeed, yourselves

Difficult: Donegal and Wexford and one other Irish county share a distinction. What is it, and what's the other county?

Easy: What town in Mayo is unique in Ireland (apart from the fact that every town is unique)?

 

  Please send all Teaser answers to me at my aol address terrymosel@aol.com

 

19: The very best of SEASON'S GREETINGS to all!

 

20. INTERESTING WEBLINKS (Disclaimer - Use of material herein from various sources does not imply approval or otherwise of the opinions, political or otherwise, of those sources).  NB: If the title in the weblink does not indicate the subject matter, I give a brief simple intro before the link. I may also comment about the link afterwards.

 

ASTROPHYSICS:

Superdense neutron star likely has a solid crust | Space

James Webb Space Telescope has bagged the oldest known galaxies | Space

Webb Completes its First "Deep Field" With Nine Days of Observing Time. What did it Find? - Universe Today

For the First Time, Astronomers Spot Stars in Galaxies that Existed Just 1 Billion Years After the Big Bang - Universe Today

JWST spots rare red spiral galaxies in the early universe | Space

Scientists prove wormholes exist in groundbreaking theoretical achievement (msn.com) I don't doubt that wormholes are possible – after all, every other prediction of relativity has been confirmed. But, this is only a simulation in a computer. They say that it "looks like a duck, it walks like a duck, it quacks like a duck". But does it fly like a duck, swim like a duck, taste like a duck? Then we can be nearly sure!

Black holes 'ring' like bells after they merge — and that could be the key to seeing inside them | Live Science

Black Holes Shouldn't be Able to Merge, but Dozens of Mergers Have Been Detected. How Do They Do It? - Universe Today

A Black Hole has been Burping for 100 Million Years - Universe Today

A New Way to Produce Primordial Black Holes in the Early Universe - Universe Today

Searching for neutrinos  https://www.facebook.com/100045998303732/posts/712944530248817/?sfnsn=mo

 

COSMOLOGY

Latest data removes anomaly in the 'Standard Model': https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-04545-z 
Gravitons https://www.facebook.com/100045998303732/posts/705226811020589/?sfnsn=scwspmo

The Voids Closest to Us May Not be Entirely Empty - Universe Today

Maybe there's no Dark Energy https://www.facebook.com/1649849195252135/posts/3463634857206884/?sfnsn=scwspmo

A New Way to Produce Primordial Black Holes in the Early Universe - Universe Today

Perhaps a Supervoid Doesn't Explain the Mysterious CMB Cold Spot - Universe Today What's so special about that 'cold spot'? - There are lots of other cold spots visible, and maybe one is just a bit colder than others. In a forest, some trees are taller than average, and it's no surprise if one is the tallest of all.

 

EARTH & MOON

Meet dearMoon crew of artists, athletes and a billionaire | Space  Has anybody noticed anything weird about that image of the Moon? It was driving me crazy until I spotted it. And made even more difficult by the fact that the people obscure most of the lower central part! Its actually just one half of the Moon, but then that image has been flipped, and then mirror imaged, and joined together with the original. It takes lots of visual detective work, but keep at it, and you'll find inverted, flipped patterns. Remember, for example, what's in the lower right of the right hand image will be flipped and inverted into the upper left hand image. Start with the pattern of 3 similar sized craters left of centre, two of which are touching, then locate that in the right hand image. Good luck!

Mysterious meteorite may unravel our understanding of the solar system (newatlas.com)

We Could Simulate Living in Lunar Lava Tubes in Caves on Earth - Universe Today

Watch a NASA Supercut of the Entire Artemis I Mission, From Launch to Landing - Universe Today

Asteroids Didn't Create the Moon's Largest Craters. Left-Over Planetesimals Did - Universe Today

Greenland's glaciers might be melting 100 times as fast as previously thought (phys.org)

To Fight Climate Change, We Could Block the Sun. A Lightweight Solar Sail Could Make it Feasible - Universe Today Crazy. It's a bit like saying to young drivers – drive as fast as you like: your seat belts and air bags will help you survive your crashes. And never mind the pollution caused by 400 rocket launches a year for 10 years! Not to mention the terrible effects on Earth-based solar astronomy.

This Interactive Tool Lets you Simulate Asteroid Impacts Anywhere on Earth - Universe Today

A Supercomputer Climate Model is so Accurate it Predicted the Weather Patterns Seen in the Famous 1972 "Blue Marble" Image of Earth - Universe Today

They're so good for a laugh! Who are the Flat Earthers and what do they believe? (msn.com) Except that a lot of them align with dangerous conspiracies like extreme religious fundamentalism, QAnon, etc.

 

EXOPLANETS

Hubble and Spitzer Team up to Find a Pair of Waterworld Exoplanets - Universe Today

James Webb Space Telescope meets the 7 intriguing exoplanets of TRAPPIST-1 | Space

Life on Proxima b Is Not Having a Good Time - Universe Today

Giant Exoplanet is Spiraling Inward to its Doom - Universe Today
8 billion Earths in the Milky Way alone! https://www.facebook.com/100057547862871/posts/570345611560363/?sfnsn=scwspmo

 

EXOLIFE

Life on Proxima b Is Not Having a Good Time - Universe Today

We Could Spread Life to the Milky Way With Comets. But Should We? - Universe Today So how are we going to get our microbes in to the centre of the comet, to protect them from cosmic rays? And then how to get them out again at some distant planetary system? And what about the ethics? – maybe those microbes will eventually evolve into the type of violent, destructive beings that we are?

What dead whales can teach us about finding aliens - Big Think

 

IMAGES

Amazing long slow multiple-bursting fireball! https://www.facebook.com/groups/26550057298/permalink/10160663673927299/

James Webb Space Telescope's 1st year in space has blown astronomers away | Space

10 greatest images from NASA's Artemis 1 moon mission | Space There's a nice shot of Copernicus, Rheinhold and Landsberg, with the Apollo 12 landing site above right of the latter.

Webb Completes its First "Deep Field" With Nine Days of Observing Time. What did it Find? - Universe Today

James Webb Space Telescope spots faint galaxy 'PEARLS' | Space

 
SETI:
One of the world's largest lasers could be used to detect alien warp drives | Live Science
Maybe aliens haven't contacted Earth because they think we're stupid | Live Science and 
Aliens haven't contacted Earth because we're not interesting yet | Space Or perhaps they look at what's happening in Ukraine, and Yemen, and China, and think: No way - they're not even remotely civilized yet.
 
SOLAR SYSTEM
Perseverance deposits first of its sample tubes https://www.facebook.com/543617930/posts/10160101691927931/?sfnsn=scwspmo

Mars' ancient atmosphere may not have had much oxygen after all | Space

Grapefruit-size fireball from mysterious Oort Cloud could rewrite the history of the solar system | Live Science

What Kind of an Impact did DART Have on Dimorphos? The Science Results are Here - Universe Today

Comet Impacts Could Have Brought the Raw Ingredients for Life to Europa's Ocean - Universe Today

Something weird is happening in Jupiter's atmosphere | Space

NASA's InSight recorded a marsquake 5 times more powerful than previous record | Space

NASA's InSight Mars mission comes to an end as all contact is lost (newatlas.com) (next one should be fitted with wipers!)

Perseverance captures audio and video from inside Martian dust devil (newatlas.com)

Perseverance's Latest Sample is Just Crumbled Regolith. When Scientists get Their Hands on it, we'll Learn so Much About how to Live on Mars - Universe Today

NASA's DART asteroid smash flung 2 million pounds of rock into space | Space Wow! 2 million pounds! Gee, that's 32 million ounces! Or, as normal people would say, about 900 tons. Why do Americans have this obsession with pounds? They quote the thrust of the rockets like the Saturn 5, or the SLS, etc in the many millions of pounds, instead of in tons. What next - the distance from NY to Washington in feet?

Mysterious meteorite may unravel our understanding of the solar system (newatlas.com)

What dead whales can teach us about finding aliens - Big Think

 

SPACE

Europe's Vega C rocket fails on 2nd mission, 2 satellites lost | Space

Hole spotted in leaky Russian Soyuz spacecraft | Space
Damaged Soyuz May Leave Crew Without A Ride Home | Hackaday

NASA's 2023 budget includes funding for moon lander besides Starship | Space

Can we save Mars robots from death by dust? | Space

Russian space debris forces space station to dodge, cancels spacewalk | Space

Wild space 'ferry' idea uses paragliders to return to Earth | Space

Three-legged MARM robot could soon be tending to spacecraft in orbit (newatlas.com)

Nigeria, Rwanda become 1st African nations to sign Artemis Accords | Space

Watch a NASA Supercut of the Entire Artemis I Mission, From Launch to Landing - Universe Today

What will NASA's Artemis I mission teach us? | Live Science

Soyuz spacecraft suffers 'fairly substantial' leak at space station | Space

South Korea's 1st moon probe Danuri begins to enter lunar orbit | Space

We Could Simulate Living in Lunar Lava Tubes in Caves on Earth - Universe Today

Inside-out asteroids: A practical method for creating space habitats (newatlas.com) Never say 'never'….

Birds use Dynamic Soaring to Pick Up Velocity. We Could Use a Similar Trick to Go Interstellar - Universe Today

Ultra-light electric motor to feed Australia's first home-grown rocket (newatlas.com)

Nuclear fusion: What does it mean for space exploration? | Space

How do astronauts take a shower? A look at life on the ISS (msn.com)

China's launch methane-fueled rocket fails, 14 satellites lost | Space

Russia will leave the International Space Station by 2024 (msn.com)

Boom! Watch this inflatable space station explode on video | Space

Sierra Space Inflated a Habitat to Destruction, Testing its Limits Before Going to Orbit - Universe Today

 

Telescopes, Instruments etc.

James Webb Space Telescope back to science operations after glitch | Space

James Webb Space Telescope's 1st year in space has blown astronomers away | Space

Construction Begins on NASA's Next-Generation Asteroid Hunter (spacedaily.com)

UK-led robotic sky scanner reveals its first galactic fingerprint – UKRI

New tool to search for neutrinos  https://www.facebook.com/100045998303732/posts/712944530248817/?sfnsn=mo
SOFIA's last flight https://www.facebook.com/100000732234194/posts/6079908385376842/?sfnsn=scwspmo

 

21. JOINING the IRISH ASTRONOMICAL ASSOCIATION. This link gives options to join the IAA.

https://irishastro.org/join-the-iaa/ If you are a UK taxpayer, please select the 'gift-aid' box, as that enables us to reclaim the standard rate of tax on your subscription, at no cost to you. You can also make a donation via Paypal if you wish: just click on the 'Donate' button. See also https://irishastro.org/  

 

The Irish Astronomical Association is registered with The Charity Commission for Northern Ireland NIC 105858

 

DISCLAIMER: Any views expressed herein are mine, and do not necessarily represent those of the IAA.

Clear skies,

Terry Moseley